Share
Explore BrainMass

Aristotle's Views About Learning and Education

What did Aristotle have to say about Education? Discuss theory of value, theory of knowledge, theory of learning, theory of human nature, theory of transmission, theory of consensus, and so on.

Solution Preview

1. What did Aristotle have to say about Education? Discuss theory of value, theory of knowledge, theory of learning, and so on).

In general, what did Aristotle have to say about Education?

1. For Aristotle, education should be guided by legislation to make it correspond with the results of psychological analysis, and follow the gradual development of the bodily and mental faculties.

2. Children should during their earliest years be carefully protected from all injurious associations, and be introduced to such amusements as will prepare them for the serious duties of life.

3. Their literary education should begin in their seventh year, and continue to their twenty-first year. This period is divided into two courses of training, one from age seven to puberty, and the other from puberty to age twenty-one.

4. For Aristotle, such education should not be left to private enterprise, but should be undertaken by the state.

5. There are four main branches of education: reading and writing, Gymnastics, music, and painting. They should not be studied to achieve a specific aim, but in the liberal spirit which creates true freemen. Thus, for example, gymnastics should not be pursued by itself exclusively, or it will result in a harsh savage type of character. Painting must not be studied merely to prevent people from being cheated in pictures, but to make them attend to physical beauty. Music must not be studied merely for amusement, but for the moral influence that it exerts on the feelings.

6. Indeed for Aristotle, all-true education is, as Plato saw, a training of our sympathies so that we may love and hate in a right manner (Sources: The Canadian Encyclopedia (2001).

The following article adds to this (e.g, theory of value, goals of education, theory of knowledge, etc.).

ARTICLE:

I. Theory of Value

What knowledge and skills are worthwhile learning? The purpose of the state is to educate the people -- to make them virtuous. Virtue is the life principle of the state. The goal of the state is to educate with a view toward its own institutions (to preserve them) - political education of all citizens (179, Davidson).

[Virtue is the perfection of ...

Solution Summary

This solution explains Aristotle's views and principles about education, such as his theory of value, theory of knowledge, theory of human nature, theory of learning, theory of transmission, theory of consensus, the four main branches of education and more. Links are also provided.

$2.19