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Ethnicity and the Police

Ethnicity and the Police Part II: Final Deliverable

You will choose from the following options:
• Option 1: Newspaper Article
• Option 2: Speech
• Option 3: Podcast

Regardless of the option selected, your final deliverable is based on your opinion about the topic and must provide evidence to support your opinion.

Option 1: Newspaper Article

Develop a 700- to 1050-word newspaper article based on the topic you selected in your Week Two individual assignment. Follow the outline created in Week Two and incorporate any changes suggested by the facilitator.

Address the following topics in your newspaper article:
- Express your opinion on the topic.
- Include at least one contemporary event as an example to illustrate the main points.
-Include three references from peer-reviewed journals, trade publications, or other sources from the Online Library Major Article Database to support your opinion.

Include photos, diagrams, or graphs as appropriate.

Format any references used in the article consistent with APA guidelines.

Submit the newspaper article assignment.

Option 2: Speech

Develop a 700- to 1050-word speech based on the topic you selected in your Week Two individual assignment.

Follow the outline created in Week Two and incorporate any changes suggested by the facilitator.

Address the following topics in your speech:
- Express your opinion on the topic.
- Include at least one contemporary event as an example to illustrate the main points.
- Include three references from peer-reviewed journals, trade publications, or other sources from the Online Library Major Article Database to support your opinion.

Format any references in the speech consistent with APA guidelines.

Submit the speech assignment.

Option 3: Podcast

Develop a 3- to 5-minute audio podcast that is based on the topic you selected in your Week Two individual assignment. Follow the outline created in Week Two and incorporate any changes suggested by the facilitator.

Address the following in your audio recording:
- Express your opinion on the topic.
- Include at least one contemporary event as an example to illustrate the main points.
- Include three references from peer-reviewed journals, trade publications, or other sources from the Online Library Major Article Database to support your opinion.

Submit the sound file to your facilitator.

Solution Preview

Newspaper Article:
Police, Race and the Media

How much is a cop's life worth? Judging by media attention, not much. On June 22, a black man shot a sheriff's deputy in Seattle several times in the head with the deputy's own gun, killing him instantly. The deputy had been trying to restrain the man, just out of jail for assaulting another officer, as he ran naked through traffic pounding on cars. The case raises troubling questions about whether the ubiquitous crusade to portray cops as racist has resulted in a potentially lethal reluctance to use necessary force. But in the three weeks since the killing occurred, the incident has received only two mentions in the press outside Seattle — an article in the New York Times, and a passing allusion on CNN.

Compare the media tsunami around the Inglewood, Ca., angry-cop case. In the first nine days after an Inglewood officer was videotaped slugging a cuffed black teen once in the head, 370 stories on the event, or 41 a day, flooded the nation's airwaves and presses. The attorney general spoke out against the Inglewood police; the Justice Department mobilized its local and national investigators; Al Sharpton and Johnnie Cochran descended upon Inglewood to pump up protest; a grand jury returned an assault indictment against the officer in record time; and the ever-gratifying narrative about rampant, racist police brutality is once again pulsating through the country (MacDonald, 2002).

The above is quite typical of the portrayal of (white) police officers in the American media. Almost designed to deliberately inflame the public, or especially, non-whites against the police and white people in general, such disparate treatment needs to be explained.

One approach is called by Harvard researchers "implicit bias." this refers to subconscious biases and prejudices, often inculcated, knowingly or not, by major media sources over time. The Harvard Study came to the following conclusions:

1. Implicit bias is everywhere and extremely pervasive.
2. Most of the time, people are unaware of them.
3. These prejudices are significant in predicting human behavior.
4. People differ in the level of prejudice as well as the targets, intensity and propensity to translate bias into action.

In terms of racial bias, the seminal article by Judge M. Bennett of the US District Court in (northern) Iowa, explains that the Harvard study mentioned above shows racial bias (implicitly) in blacks and whites against each other, studies have repeatedly shown this is not the case among police ...

Solution Summary

The expert examines the ethnicity and the police. How to incorporate any changes by facilitators are determined.

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