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Steinbeck's use of the lyrical chapters of Grapes of Wrath

1) How does the way in which Steinbeck utilizes the lyrical chapters of Grapes of Wrath enhance the story being told?

2) What do these chapters bring to the novel?

3) What affect do these chapters have on rhythm, depth, and focus?

I need to reference specific chapters for examples.

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Please rate 5/5 for my ideas. I hope my notes help you:

1) As you examine how Steinbeck's use of the lyrical chapters of Grapes of Wrath enhance the story being told, I feel like it adds so much poetry, lyricism, sociopolitical commentary, historical context, and overall "glue" or cohesion to link the novel together. An example of how the chapters link or offer continuity might be Chapter 29's details about the rains and flood of the California valley and how it is framed by the initial raindrops at the end of Chapter 28 and the floods.

For me, the lyrical chapters offer contrast to articulate fully how the Joad family operates as part of the big picture within the American farming and migrant experience in America. They also add more depth as in the example: "The driver sat in his iron seat and he was proud of the straight lines he did not will, proud of the tractor he did not own or love, proud of the power he could not control. And when that crop grew, and was harvested, no man had crumbled a hot clod ...

Solution Summary

Steinbeck's use of the lyrical chapters of Grapes of Wrath is briefly explained using textual evidence and reader response notes.

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