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Target Cash Balance and Credit Policy

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A) What are the two principal reasons for holding cash? Can a firm estimate its target cash balance by summing the cash held to satisfy each of the two?

B) Why would a lock box plan make more sense for a firm that makes sales over the United States than for a firm with the same volume of business but concentrated in its home city?

C) What are the four elements of a firm's credit policy? To what extent can firms set their own credit policies as opposed to having to accept policies that are dictated by "the competition"?

D) 1- What is the days sales outstanding (DSO) for a firm whose sales are $2,920,000 per year and whose accounts receivable are $312,000? 2- Is it true that if this firm sells 3/10, net 40, its customers probably all pay on time? 3- Is it true that if a firm calculates its days sales outstanding, it has no need for an aging schedule?

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What are the two principal reasons for holding cash? Can a firm estimate its target cash balance by summing the cash held to satisfy each of the two?
Ans: Two principal reasons for holding cash are: 1) for transactional purposes, and 2) to maintain a minimum account balance. No, a firm cannot estimate its target cash balance by summing the cash held because the money can satisfy both the transactions and minimum account balance.

Why would a lock box plan make more sense for a firm that makes sales over the ...

Solution Summary

Solution includes principle reasons for holding cash, use of a lock box, elements of a firm's credit policy, and days sales outstanding to name a few.

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Capital budgeting

Dorothy Koehl recently leased space in the Southside Mall and opened a new business, Koehl's Doll Shop. Business has been good, but Koehl has frequently run out of cash. This has necessitated late payment on certain orders, which, in turn, is beginning to cause a problem with suppliers. Koehl plans to borrow from the bank to have cash ready as needed, but first shee needs a forecast of just how much she must borrow. Accordingly, she has asked you to prepare a cash budget for the critical period around Christmas, when needs will be especially high.

Sales are made on a cash basis only. Koehl's purchases must be paid for during the following month. Koehl pays herself a salary of $4800 per month, and the rent is $2000 per month. In addition, she must make a tax payment of $12,000 in December. The current cash on hand (on December 1) is $400, but Koehl has agreed to maintain an average bank balance of $6000--this is her target cash balance. (Disregard till cash, which is insignificant because Koehl keeps only a small amount on hand in order to lessen the chances of robbery.)

The estimated sales and purchases for December, January, February are shown below. Purchases during November amounted to $140,000.

Sales Purchases
December $160,000 $40,000
January $40,000 $40,000
February $60,000 $40,000

a. Prepare a cash budget for December, January, and February.

TEXTBOOK ANSWERS:
December: deficit = $4,400
January deficit = $11,200
February surplus = $2,000

b. Now suppose Koehl were to start selling on a credit basis on December 1, giving customers 30 days to pay. All customers accept these terms, and all other facts in the problem are unchanged. What would the company's loan requirements be at the end of December in this case?

TEXTBOOK ANSWER: $164,400

I have attached an excel toolkit that our teacher says we can use to just imput the data and get the answer, but I can't figure out how to do it.

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