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Workplace privacy: Where would you draw the line

Currently, workplace privacy is a very hot topic and it continues to be a contentious issue because technology is outpacing the law. New technologies for communication and new technologies for surveillance go beyond what the law has previously addressed.

Explain what right to privacy you believe an employee should enjoy at work.

Describe what right to surveillance a company should have in watching over employees it is paying and property it owns.

Note: If you are not in management or do not own a company, consider what rights you would want for surveillance with regards to a nanny you hired to watch your child in your home.

The hardest ethical dilemmas to decide are ones that involve competing rights. Explain where you would draw the line with regards to workplace privacy.

Solution Preview

In the past two decades, the way employees are monitored in the workplace has dramatically changed, however the laws that protect employees rights to privacy are still outdated and offer little to no protection against how an employer monitors employees. In the past, when an employee came to work, there was a general expectation of security monitoring for the purposes of deterring theft and maintaining site security. Outside of that, there was limited monitoring capability. Employees enjoyed a sense of freedom at work. That is no longer the case.

The current technologies that exist allow employers to monitor every aspect of an employees work day. Phones, computers, email, hidden ...

Solution Summary

The current technologies that exist allow employers to monitor every aspect of an employees work day. Phones, computers, email, hidden cameras, wireless cameras, digital programs designed to monitor patterns at computer stations and the amount of idol time at the workstation can be monitored. Employees are watched on hidden cameras as they work to ensure production rates are maintained and no goofing off are occurring and in many cases are disciplined for what is seen on the video (Evans, 2007).

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