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    Plagiarism

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    At the age of 19, Kavya Viswanathan had made achievements beyond the reach of many. She was a sophomore in Harvard and her first novel, "How Opal Mehta Got Kissed, Got Wild and Got a Life," was part of a highly publicized two-book deal with publisher Little, Brown and Company. Viswanathanâ??s future seemed bright, until an article in the Harvard Crimson brought it all down. The paper noticed multiple similarities with two books by the young-adult novelist Megan McCafferty. In some passages the text appeared to be copied word for word. Take a look at the comparisons between McCafferty's writing and Viswanathan's and judge for yourself: http://www.publishersmarketplace.com/lunch/Passages.pdf. Viswanathan confessed to copying the passages, and as a result, the publishers recalled all copies of her book currently on sale. Why did Little, Brown and Company act so strongly in this event, or the college paper, for that matter, bring the issue to light? What was so wrong about Viswanathan's actions?

    Education refers to the continuous development and maintenance of ideas. Part of this understanding is the principle of giving credit where credit is due. Taking the ideas or words of others and passing them off as your own is called plagiarism and represents the greatest offense a person can make in academia. Take a few moments to review the Resources for this week.

    Respond to the following:

    What are three things you learned about plagiarism, and how will you use that knowledge? How will you ensure your work is properly cited? What strategies will you use?

    Why is it important to have academic integrity? Think about the role of academic integrity as it relates to you, your classmates, your Instructor, the institution, and the company you may work for. What are some of the implications when academic integrity is not valued or upheld by others?

    How does this translate to the world of management?

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    Solution Preview

    Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

    Plagiarism is an act of taking someone else's work and using it as your own. Most academic institutions have no empathy towards anyone that commits this act and consequences can potentially ruin one's academic career. The actual definition of plagiarism is as follows:
    Plagiarism-The unauthorized use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own original work, as by not crediting the author (www.doctionary.reference.com)

    Learn how to use citations. Colleges and universities always require work to be cited in either APA or MLA style. It is essential to be familiar with your form of citation and use it correctly. There are different forms of plagiarism and not citing properly is one of them. Even if it is not intentional, a professor can view this as attempting to ...

    Solution Summary

    Plagiarism is an act of taking someone else's work and using it as your own. Most academic institutions have no empathy towards anyone that commits this act and consequences can potentially ruin one's academic career. The actual definition of plagiarism is as follows:
    Plagiarism-The unauthorized use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own original work, as by not crediting the author (www.doctionary.reference.com)

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