Explore BrainMass

Explore BrainMass

    Physics: lunar eclipse

    Not what you're looking for? Search our solutions OR ask your own Custom question.

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    During a lunar eclipse, the Moon is not completely dark, but it is often a deep red in color. Explain this in terms of refraction of all the sunsets and sunrises around the world.

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 8:30 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/physics/light-refraction/physics-lunar-eclipse-283860

    SOLUTION This solution is FREE courtesy of BrainMass!

    During a lunar eclipse, the Moon is not completely dark, but it is often a deep red in color. Explain this in terms of refraction of all the sunsets and sunrises around the world.

    During a total lunar eclipse, the Moon can take on a range of colors from dark brown and red to bright orange and yellow. The exact appearance depends on how much dust and clouds are present in Earth's atmosphere. Earth's atmosphere also bends or refracts some of this light so that a small fraction of it can reach and illuminate the Moon.

    Refraction of the sun's rays causes blue light to pass straight down to the earth. Red light does not come straight down. That is why sunset and sunrise is red.

    This red light hits the moon during eclipses that are near blackouts of the moon.

    The Earth blocks the Sun's light from reaching the Moon. While the Moon remains completely within Earth's umbral shadow, indirect sunlight still manages to reach and illuminate it. However, this sunlight must first pass through the Earth's atmosphere which filters out most of the blue colored light. The remaining light is a deep red or orange in color and is much dimmer than pure white sunlight.

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 8:30 pm ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/physics/light-refraction/physics-lunar-eclipse-283860

    ADVERTISEMENT