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Family Violence, Frustration Theory and Feminist Theory

Joe had a bad day at work. He spent the past three weeks working on an architectural design for some clients, carefully incorporating every detail they requested. Joe felt as if he had done a superior job and that his plans would far outshine his clients' expectations. He met with his clients, and they did not like anything he had done. According to them, the bathroom, kitchen sink, and refrigerator were in the wrong places, and the refrigerator needed to be moved to a space that also needed enlargement. That was just the beginning. Joe felt as if three weeks' work was lost and he needed to start all over again.

Angry, frustrated, and feeling as if he has no control over his own job, Joe returned home that evening. Because the meeting with his clients ran overtime, his dinner was cold. Screaming at his wife, Mary, he picked up the plate and hurled it at the wall, barely missing his 11-year-old daughter. Joe ordered Mary to get him a fresh plate with hot food, and he "wanted it now!" When Mary hesitantly told him that she would have to cook something and that it would take about 20 minutes, Joe lost it. He got up from the table, hit Mary in the jaw, and kicked her as she hit the floor. He then stormed out of the house to get his dinner elsewhere.

How does the above scenario fit psychological aggression or frustration theory? What about feminist or patriarchal theory? Do you think the scenario fits one theory better than the other? Why or why not?

Solution Preview

Frustration/Aggression Theory was my first thought when reading the story.

Here's the notion - frustration turns into aggression when --
a) the excitement that builds when reaching a goal is suddenly eliminated by disappointment or
b) your expectations on reaching the goal - close to completion - are frustrated.

The ...

Solution Summary

The solution discusses family violence, the frustration theory and feminist theory.