Share
Explore BrainMass

Mutiple choice questions on Memory

Attached file also has questions

1. Memory researchers have suggested that may have evolutionary significance because they were adaptive in human survival.
a. episodes of source amnesia
b. formation of flashbulb memories
c. serial position effects
d. experiences of childhood amnesia

2. Chad remembers the feeling of excitement in his house when his mother stepped through the door with his new baby sister. He can still picture the tiny baby with a stocking cap on her head. His parents can't convince him that he was staying with his grandparents when his sister came home and that he has a memory of something that never happened. Chad's errant memory is an example of:
a. confabulation
b. childhood amnesia
c. psychogenic amnesia
d. repression

3. False memories can be as stable over time as true one's, because memory is:
a. a passive process
b. a process of recall
c. often repressed
d. reconstructive

4. Eyewitness testimonies by victims are most likely to contain errors when the suspect is:
a. of different ethnic background than the victim
b. significantly younger than the victim
c. older than the victim
d. of a different gender than the victim

5. In the debate regarding children's memories of sexual abuse, it has become clear that:
a. children's memories should not be trusted because they will say whatever adults expect them to say.
b. preschoolers' memories should not be trusted because they confuse fantasy with reality.
c. school-aged children are more vulnerable to suggestive questions than preschoolers are.
d. children do not lie about or misremember traumatic experiences, such as sexual abuse.

6. Which one of the following statements about children's eyewitness testimony is TRUE?
a. Children are more reliable eyewitnesses than adults, because they have a stronger need to be protected from harm.
b. Convictions in the McMartin preschool case in Los Angeles proved the reliability of children's eyewitness testimony.
c. The younger the child, the more susceptible he or she is to an adult's suggestion of alleged wrongdoing by another person.
d. Children always lie about situations that feel threatening to them.

7. Chad's co-worker walks by his office and tells him to bring the X-files to the next meeting. Forty seconds later, Chad can't remember what files he is supposed to bring. This information has escaped from Chad's memory.
a. long-term
b. short-term
c. sensory
d. working

8. Information will be stored in our _ memory only if we make a conscious effort to retain it.
a. sensory
b. working
c. short-term
d. long-term

9. Short-term memory receives information from:
a. sensory and parallel memory
b. sensory and long-term memory
c. the environment
d. sensory and working memory

10. When Samantha recalls the time when her mother took her to a New Kids on the Block concert, she is relying on her memory.
a. episodic
b. semantic
c. procedural
d. sensory

11. Individuals who are excellent equestrians rely on memory.
a. episodic
b. declarative
c. procedural
d. semantic

12. Receptor neurons, dendrites and certain types of synapses in the formation of long-term memory.
a. increase, grow, and become more responsive
b. stay relatively the same
c. become less responsive
d. consolidate and become a neural network

13. Hormones are most likely to enhance memory, if our arousal level:
a. is high
b. is low
c. spikes and then levels off
d. remains moderate

14. Elinor wants to promote her retention of the reasons why people conform to a group. She decides to relate this information to her previous experiences in a sorority. Elinor is using to enhance her learning.
a. repetition
b. elaborative rehearsal
c. automatic encoding
d. maintenance rehearsal

15. When Susan was in high school, she learned "old math" principles. Now an adult, she has enrolled in the local community college where her teacher is presenting "new math" problem-solving principles. Susan is having difficulty with the course because of:
a. retroactive interference
b. decay
c. proactive interference
d. cue-dependent forgetting

16. Zeke finds that he performs better on exams that are given in his regular psychology classroom than on exams given in the large lecture hall. Zeke is experiencing.
a. the importance of retrieval cues in memory
_ b. the role of retroactive interference
c. proactive interference
d. the importance of state-dependent memory

17. Recovered memories of earlier abuse are likely to be more accurate when:
a. a therapist uses hypnosis to uncover the memory
b. "talk" therapy helps the person spontaneously recall the memory
c. a person spontaneously recalls the abuse
d. dream analysis uncovers what the therapist suspected about the client-victim's repressed abuse.

18. Most people can remember come childhood events that occurred around the ages of:
a. 1 to 2
b. 2 to 3
c. 3 to 4
d. 4 to 5

19. Jaime is nearing retirement age. His boss has asked him to write the story of his professional career from a positive point of view for the company newsletter. This positive "spin" will guide what Jamie:
a. feels about his life's work, looking back on it after all these years.
b. remembers from the early days and how he interprets its influence on his current professional status.
c. chooses to remember and what he chooses to forget
d. says about his boss, because he won't want to jeopardize his retirement.

20. Taking time out for study breaks and recreation will:
a. improve your memory
b. reinforce poor study habits
c. interfere with what you have learned.
d. Have neither a positive nor a negative impact on your learning curve.

Attachments

Solution Preview

1. Memory researchers have suggested that may have evolutionary significance because they were adaptive in human survival.
a. episodes of source amnesia
__b. formation of flashbulb memories
c. serial position effects
d. experiences of childhood amnesia

Answer: b. formation of flashbulb memories
Flashbulb memories are memories that do not appear to fade with time: often they are the apparent result of unexpected and emotional events.

2. Chad remembers the feeling of excitement in his house when his mother stepped through the door with his new baby sister. He can still picture the tiny baby with a stocking cap on her head. His parents can't convince him that he was staying with his grandparents when his sister came home and that he has a memory of something that never happened. Chad's errant memory is an example of:
__a. confabulation
b. childhood amnesia
c. psychogenic amnesia
d. repression

Answer: a. confabulation

A confabulation is a fantasy that has unconsciously replaced fact in memory. A confabulation may be based partly on fact or be a complete construction of the imagination.

3. False memories can be as stable over time as true one's, because memory is:
a. a passive process
b. a process of recall
c. often repressed
__d. reconstructive

Answer: d. reconstructive

'Memory's tendency to be reconstructive, combined with the desire to believe, combined with a culturally available script, leads to a false memory.

4. Eyewitness testimonies by victims are most likely to contain errors when the suspect is:
__a. of different ethnic background than the victim
b. significantly younger than the victim
c. older than the victim
d. of a different gender than the victim

Answer: a. of different ethnic background than the victim

5. In the debate regarding children's memories of sexual abuse, it has become clear that:
a. children's memories should not be trusted because they will say whatever adults expect them to say.
__b. preschoolers' memories should not be trusted because they confuse fantasy with reality.
c. school-aged children are more vulnerable to suggestive questions than preschoolers are.
d. ...

Solution Summary

Answers mutiple choice questions on memory.

$2.19