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Rhetoric Question

What is a rhetoric question? Include a definition of erotema, anacoenosis, anthypophora, dianoea, aporia, epiplexis, exuscitatio, pysma and ratiocinatio. Provide examples of each.

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1. What is a rhetoric question? Include a definition of the following concepts: erotema, anacoenosis, anthypophora, dianoea, aporia, epiplexis, exuscitatio, pysma and ratiocinatio. Give several examples.

The rhetorical question is usually defined as any question asked for a purpose other than to obtain the information the question asks.

For example, "Why are you so stupid?" is likely to be a statement regarding one's opinion of the person addressed rather than a genuine request to know. Similarly, when someone responds to a tragic event by saying, "Why me, God?!" it is more likely to be an accusation or an expression of feeling than a realistic request for information.

Rhetorical questions are also (at least sometimes) about asking questions not intended to gain information but to assert more emphatically the obvious answer to what is asked. Sometimes, 'no answer', in fact, is expected by the speaker. The device is illustrated in the following series of sentences: "Did you help me when I needed help? Did you once offer to intercede in my behalf? Did you do anything to lessen my load?"

Other types of rhetoric questions include:

Apart from these more obviously rhetorical uses, the question as a grammatical form ...

Solution Summary

This solution describes an rhetoric question by definition and example. It also provides definitions and examples for several concepts: erotema, anacoenosis, anthypophora, dianoea, aporia, epiplexis, exuscitatio, pysma and ratiocinatio. Links are also provided.

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