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Douglass's "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave"

1) What figurative language does Douglass appear to be using in his memoir?

2) How does this affect the reading of the Narrative?

3) Is there another type of figurative language that might have been more appropriate or had more impact on the reader? If so, how?

4) What is the relationship between the physical effects of violence and the emotional ones? How do these effects help develop the story?

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For the student,
Thank you for coming back to Brainmass.Com for your homework assistance. Since your first question deals directly with all areas of figurative language, I went ahead and compiled the definitions you needed to know.

Figurative Language

Figurative Language
Whenever you describe something by comparing it with something else, you are using figurative language. Any language that goes beyond the literal meaning of words in order to furnish new effects or fresh insights into an idea or a subject. The most common figures of speech are simile, metaphor, and alliteration.


Language that appeals to the senses. Descriptions of people or objects stated in terms of our senses. (According to this story that Douglass wrote, he based his story on VIVID Imagery which is doubly stronger than just pure imagery alone.)

A figure of speech which involves a direct comparison between two unlike things, usually with the words like or as. Example: The muscles on his brawny arms are strong as iron bands.

A figure of speech which involves an implied comparison between two relatively unlike things using a form of be. The comparison is not announced by like or as. Example: The road was a ribbon of moonlight.

To complete this assignment, all you need to do is the following steps~

Step 1~You should definitely read the entire section of the "Preface" written by William Lloyd Garrison because this section will give you the background to the purpose of Douglass's "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave". You will grasp the whole purpose behind his writing this narrative, and to be able to ...

Solution Summary

Douglass's "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave" is examined in terms of race relations and figurative language devices. References are also provided to further validate the findings.