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Organic acids vs. aldehydes vs. alcohols vs. alkanes

1) When organic acids are subjected to continuing increases in temperature, and depending on the acid itself, is it reasonable to assume that organic acids convert first to aldehydes, then to alcohols, then to alkanes given increasing temperature??? It is also a fair assumption that condensing of these compounds would occur in the inverse order???

2) What exactly is an alkane and alkene??

3) What is an ester?? does it relate to anything above??

4) How is a ketone derived or result???

Solution Preview

1) When organic acids are subjected to continuing increases in temperature, and depending on the acid itself, is it reasonable to assume that organic acids convert first to aldehydes, then to alcohols, then to alkanes given increasing temperature? It it aso a fair assumption that condensing of these compounds would occur in the inverse order?

Response: Generally speaking, carboxylic acids are inert to reduction by heat alone. In fact, carboxylic acids are quite stable to both oxidation and reduction. Therefore, we would not expect them to under successive stages of reduction from the acid to the aldehyde to the alcohol and then to the alkane.

If you were condensing these compounds, you would expect them to come out of the gas phase starting with the ones with the highest boiling point and ending with the ones with the lowest boiling point. Generally ...

Solution Summary

1) When organic acids are subjected to continuing increases in temperature, and depending on the acid itself, is it reasonable to assume that organic acids convert first to aldehydes, then to alcohols, then to alkanes given increasing temperature??? It is also a fair assumption that condensing of these compounds would occur in the inverse order???

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