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The ethics of TARP and executive bonuses

I think that we have to hold out hope that after the crimes (ethics violations) are brought-to-light, organizations will feel that followed indiscretions will be too obvious or are no longer seen as a possible loop hole, gray area, or worth while risk. The fact that some of these organizations still saw extravagant retreats, bonuses, and rewards as neccessary or appropriate after the TARP provisions were paid out, is a gross disregard for what I see as ethical.

Do you think that the executives within these organizations saw these acts as unethical or ethical? Moreover, do you believe that this further proof that in some instances business ethics can be somewhat subjective?

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Some of the executives may have been uncomfortable, but they did not see them as unethical. I am sure some were arrogant enough to think they were above public opinion and the government. However, most saw them as a continuation of a business practice that is viable in many circumstances. They are rewards for jobs done well and while we see them as ...

Solution Summary

A short discussion on the subject of ethics and the TARP payment and executive bonuses.