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Offspring Dispersion

1. As this male and its mate search their territory for insects to feed their young they wander widely but are able to return straight back to the nest once they have found food. What ability are they using to do so?

At the end of the first nesting period, suppose this male and its mate have successfully raised one son and one daughter. According to the Oedipus hypothesis, which offspring is more likely to disperse? Explain why it is this offspring that is forced to leave.

As this dispersing offspring searches for optimal habitat in which to settle, what will determine how choosy it will be (in other words, what will determine whether it settles in suboptimal habitat or continues to search for optimal habitat)?

2. Not all species are territorial and members of some species are territorial some times but not other times (for example, sunbirds). For territoriality to be beneficial, two requirements of resources must be met.

What is one of these resource requirements? Why wouldn't a species be territorial if this requirement is NOT met?

What is the second of these resource requirements? Why wouldn't a species be territorial if this requirement is NOT met?

Solution Preview

H. The ability to return to a nest site directly is referred to as homing. See http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&client=safari&rls=en&defl=en&q=define:Homing&sa=X&oi=glossary_definition&ct=title for a definition of homing.

I. The Oedipus hypothesis puts the son in direct conflict with the father for the mother's reproductive potential. In most cases it is the son that is displaced by the father to prevent loss of the female reproductive ...

Solution Summary

Various animal behaviour in relation to nest location, dispersal, and habitat choice is discussed in this solution, which is 277 words including references.

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